Add Tempting Subheads to Your WordPress Posts with Subtitles Plugin


Perhaps the most important string of text for any article or blog post is the headline (the title). Your visitor is going to read your headline, and then based on that, decide whether or not to wade into your text (if only for skimming purposes).

People don’t mind giving headlines a shot because they’re short and, hopefully, to the point. But your text is another matter. Text that is not relevant to the reader can be torturous. It’s work. And so people are naturally very leery of diving into text unless they’re pretty sure it’s going to pay off.

You Headline Needs to Do A LOT of Work

All this means your headline needs to do A LOT of work. It needs to convince your visitors to give your text a chance.

But headlines, especially in WordPress, are not very long. So that compounds the problem.

But what if you could have a subhead? What if you got an extra shot to entice your readers to delve into your text? It would almost be like getting two first impressions. It would almost be like getting a Mulligan (a do-over shot) on every golf hole. It would almost be like cheating.

Subheads are great because readers consider them to be like headlines: they’re short; they stand out; and they’re easy to read at a glance (i.e. easily scanable). In other words, your readers are much more likely to give your subhead a read than they are your first line of text.


There’s a Plugin for That

Enter the Subtitle 360 plugin.

This deceptively simple plugin adds a meta-box to your write page that allows you to insert subheads (wrapped in H4 tags) into your posts and pages. You can then choose where you would like the subheads to appear by inserting a line of code into your theme (e.g. on the home page, on single-post pages, on archive pages, etc.).

Although subheads may seem like cheating, they aren’t. They’re just smart. Why not take advantage of them?

You can find the Subtitle 360 plugin here.

Photo: Adam & Eve from BigStock