APC and Memcached affecting /wp-admin/

I've been trying out different methods of cacheing on our WP network over the last week. WP-super-cache spits out a lot of errors in the logs, W3TC doesn't really support multisite (you can't network activate it), so I looked at APC and Memcached with batcache.

I like batcache, but using either APC or Memcached as the backend, I've noticed that it caches WordPress admin pages. For example, when activating and deactivating a plugin or changing some settings, I'm then served a cached version and its confusing. I've disabled plugins but still see their settings showing up in the settings panel. WHen I clear the cache, it fixes it, but on a network, I can't clear the cache every time someone changes a setting.

Surely people aren't running batcache like this? Does anyone have any ideas/experience that can fix this?

Thanks very much
Joss

  • aecnu

    Greetings josswinn,

    Thank you for your feedback, it is appreciated.

    I have no comment on the caching issue at this time due to you know how I feel about caching though I did not mention the security risks involved.

    When I did dabble with caching I used WP Super Cache and did not have any errors that I am aware of.

    But my entire companies on both sides of the big pond dumped caching for beef which has proved to be a windfall to include using gzip and browser compression (that is where the beef comes in) slamming compressed pages to the browser which then turns around and the browser uses the clients computer to decompress the file which exponentially increases the computer power by proxy by way of using the end users computer to display the pages.

    I will let this ticket ride for awhile so that other members like Mustafa has can offer their opinions and interaction.

    Cheers, Joe

  • Christopher Price

    Sorry to jump on this late. I have been very happy with Quick Cache
    http://www.primothemes.com/post/product/quick-cache-plugin-for-wordpress/

    It is very simple to use and basically invisible to Site Admins and visitors. Another nice feature is that it doesn't cache site files when an Admin is logged in... so they will see their changes immediately even if the cache isn't immediately updated. It reportedly is compatible with batcache too, if you are headed that way.

  • Hubert Nguyen

    It really depends on your site, but here's my take:

    WP-Super-Cache is simple and efficient for small sites, or sites that don't get too much long-tail traffic. You should avoid it if you write the cache file over NFS.

    If you get a fair share of your traffic in long-tail articles, you may want to cache in memory, with Memcached or APC via Batcache/W3TC and other such plug-ins.

    You may also want to consider Varnish, which caches the front-end and is totally independent of Wordpress. You will need a plug-in to purge cached pages, and you can program it to not cache /wp-admin/ or anything else that you don't want cache. It is not the simplest one to deploy, but it is probably one of the most efficient and can scale beyond anything Apache could serve - even static files.

    Finally, make sure that your MYSQL DB has its own caching activated.

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