Asp developer starting work in WP has questions

My questions may seem odd, to me it’s odd that I can’t seem to see how to do what I have done in asp.net. I am very new to WP (lets say fell off the truck new) but I have a lot of experience in asp, html, css, etc but I am having a problem translating what I have always done into WP. My site is for projects within my company. Each project wil have an owner with 0 or more team members that are also part of the whole company. Everyone can read everything from all projects but only the owner and team members of that project can update the project (and the site admin) depending on team member roles. I have been told to use subdirectories not subdomains to throw that in. Any employee can become a project owner and must be able to set up his/her own project and also establish team members and their roles. A user can be owner of 0, 1, or many projects. A user need not own any projects. So I did a bit of research and I think that:

1) Using the Members plug in will give me groups and some additional stuff i will need

2) Using a custom post type for the project should work

3) and here is where I do not understand the ways of WP. I will say this in my HTML/asp way… I need to display a “new project” form so that the employee can enter project details and have those details saved into the WP MySQL DB tables. And, I need to display an “update project” form that shows those saved details to the owner/team members so that they may change them and save them to the DB. I have looked at contact forms stuff where the outcome is an email but I need it to go directly into the DB assuming fields validate. I just can’t seem to see how to do this in WP. Adding a new post is available only to the admin. What I need to do is make that available to registered users and to allow updates to it from a group of assigned users.

Also, while I am new to PHP, I dig into coding and knwo there will be a bit here. Am I on-track with #1 and #2? Did i just miss something about #3 and how Wp works?

  • James Dunn
    • The Crimson Coder

    Goodday @gevalia

    Welcome to WordPress and the WPMUDev forums – it’s quite a community here.

    Anyway, I’ll leave most of this to someone else because I usually try NOT to comment on things I’m not certain of or that I’m not experienced with.

    However, the forms – and their eventual storing of data in the MySQL Database – that’s an area that I’ve got a good bit of experience with. While there are probably others that will do this, there are two that come to mind.

    1) Gravity Forms – an outstanding WordPress plugin that allows you to set up customized forms and the data is stored in the MySQL Database for later retrieval and use. The forms, upon submission, can also email the data to anyone of your choosing.

    2) Formidable Pro – another outstanding WordPress plugin that allows you to also set up customized forms and the data is stored in the MySQL Database for later retrieval and use. There are two advantages to Formidable Pro. (a) It costs less (b) The data entered in the form can later be edited by the original submitter (Gravity Forms does not have that capability).

    Take a look at both of those – they are the major players in the forms arena.

    Hope that is helpful to you.

    James Dunn

    Athens, GA USA

  • James Dunn
    • The Crimson Coder

    Goodday @gevalia

    Take a look at this plugin – ST Insert Post – and see if it will work for you. I use the Genesis framework and Genesis has it’s own Front End Editor that I’ve used, but it ONLY works with Genesis.

    Be sure to post back with questions and requests for help. There are many here that should be able to help you.

    James Dunn

    Athens, GA USA

  • gevalia
    • WPMU DEV Initiate

    James, I’m having a serious terminology issue when talking and researching about WP. I’m hoping you can straighten me out on this. If we talk straight HTML, let’s say I have a web page that allows users to enter data and it does a post. However its done, the page save the data after validation to the a DB. Is this type of process what is referred to as a contact form? In what I have done, a contact form is just a web page that contains company contact info such as physical address, hours of operation etc.

    The problem with dealing with a noobie is that every answer spurs 5 more questions. Thanks for your help!

    Ron

  • James Dunn
    • The Crimson Coder

    Hey Ron (@gevalia).

    I definitely understand the terminology void that you feel you are in – been there many times.

    This may not be standardized terminology, but it seems to be accepted terminology. Whenever I (or many others) talk about forms, we are talking about pages that have places for the end user to enter data which is then stored/forwarded to a designated website contact. An example is an insurance company that I’ve been working on that has about 40 forms where visitors can submit information to get various types of insurance quotes or request service. The end user enters data, clicks submit, and the form information is sent (via email) to the appropriate party (as well as stored in the MySQL database tables.

    What you are talking about with allowing someone to input data and it appears as a post (a term that I personally don’t care for), then that would probably be best described as “Front End Posting” as opposed to “Back End Posting” which is taking someone to the backend of WordPress to do their data entry. So far, I’ve not seen a Front End Posting plugin that I am completely in love with. I use the Genesis Framework and we have a Genesis only Front End Posting plugin that is pretty good, but it still lacks some things that I’d like to see. I put it on a client’s website but she was well versed with WordPress and figured out pretty quickly that it didn’t allow her to set up posts for publication at a later date. I eventually just let her into the backend and she’s been fine with it.

    If you do decide to let someone in the backend, then I would use either the Dev plugin for White Labeling WordPress or one of the others that are available. However, so far, I’ve only seen two that are of real use in this endeavour – the one in Dev and another one that has just come out in the past couple of weeks. I’ll be writing and article (my preferred word over post) on wpmu.org in the next week or two that discusses this specific issue and the ways to accomplish white labeling.

    When you talk about the Company’s contact information, personally, I’d just call that a Contact Information page – some call it a Contact Us page and include all the ways to contact the company (including the aforementioned Contact Form). I’m perfectly fine with that and understand it when I see it. I hate it when people label page tabs in a convoluted manner that leaves you wondering what’s there. When I used to teach business owners about business matters, I always told them, “A confused buyer does not buy, but goes away to your competition.” The same applies in website design to me. If someone comes to a website and it’s not apparent what they should do, they will go away (and probably never come back.That’s why observing accepted standards is always a good idea.

    I apologize if this is more information than you wanted, but I got to writing and I just couldn’t quit. LOL. Regardless, let us know what we can do to help and I hope the thesis I wrote here is helpful. If not, just ask – I’m never insulted. :wink:

    Also, I don’t want to appear to be insulting because I have no intention of that, but have you watched all the videos in the WPMUDev membership? If not, watch them. I know that you will find yourself knowing most of the things, but you may pick up some things of value there and it may even answer some questions you didn’t know you had. It may also help you with terminology.

    Good luck and post back for what you need. Tag me in your posts and I’ll try to chime in (just put the @ symbol and start typing my user name – it will appear at the bottom of the “Reply” box and you can click it to tag me).

    James Dunn

    Athens, GA USA

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