BuddyPress

Now, I love WPMUDev.org. Every penny that I paid for my membership has been worthwhile. So, I don't want to seem ungrateful, I just want to start a conversation... :wink:

Today, I downloaded the Moderation plugin that has been developed and excitedly installed it. My site, Petomundo! like a lot of others is wide open, and as such has troubles with a lot of spammers, so this looked like the perfect plugin to help deal with that.

After the plugin not working as described, I returned to the forums, and looked for feedback. The answer:

The problem is that the moderation plugin wasn't designed for buddypress sites.

And then:

We'll look into BuddyPress compatibility for this plugin. It will most likely be August or September though due to other items ahead of this one

Now, I understand that I did not commission this plugin, nor was it in any way meant to be used for me alone, but seriously, how can something on this site not made for BuddyPress?

I have talked with Matt Mullenweg a lot about BuddyPress in the last few months, curious about how Automattic is going to position the product and have him say that they have talked about just rolling it into the WPMU package. Imagine that, with an install you get all of the benefits of WPMU + BuddyPress. Don't like social networking? Throw the switch and turn it off.

<end small rant>

My only argument is that if someone is going to be developing seriously for the WPMU crowd, certain considerations need to be considered, and BuddyPress compatibility in my mind is a large one.

Once again, love the site, love the plugins and themes, also love the forums where I can rant... :wink:

</end small rant>

  • Andrew

    Hi There,

    We always appreciate good feedback but this feels more like you're ranting at us for not making every plugin compatible with BuddyPress.

    First I'd like to point out our BuddyPress page that lists all of the plugins that are BuddyPress Compatible:
    https://premium.wpmudev.org/buddypress/

    That page is right up there on the main menu. So we're definitely not trying to hide the fact that not all of our plugins are BuddyPress compatible.

    Second I'd like to explain why some of our plugins aren't BuddyPress compatible:

    1) BuddyPress places a lot of stuff that is typically handled in the backend on the frontend. That's one of the reasons BuddyPress requires special themes. Obviously that results in some plugins originaly coded for WPMU not being BuddyPress compatible.

    2) A lot of the plugins available on this site were coded before BuddyPress existed. We're currently working on updating a lot of the plugins but as you can imagine that takes time.

    So thanks for the feedback but if the ranting could be kept to a minimum next time that would be greatly appreciated. For instance you ranted about the Moderation plugin not being BuddyPress compatible but we never said it was nor is it on our list of BuddyPress compatible plugins.

    Thanks,
    Andrew

  • James Farmer

    Andrew's completely right - whatever Matt says or is aiming at, BuddyPress is a looooong way from being a simple WP addition and currently operates in a very different way to WPMU.

    We are working towards as much compatibility as we can though, including themes and specific BP plugins, but at the end of the day we're limited by time and other priorities (like servicing the WPMU market).

    Still... we'll get there in the end.

  • Glenn

    Hi whyisjake,

    I have talked with Matt Mullenweg a lot about BuddyPress in the last few months, curious about how Automattic is going to position the product and have him say that they have talked about just rolling it into the WPMU package. Imagine that, with an install you get all of the benefits of WPMU + BuddyPress. Don't like social networking? Throw the switch and turn it off.

    At WordCamp San Francisco last month, Matt mentioned that WPMU and normal WP will be merging into a single package. This basically means at some point in the future, when you download WordPress from wordpress.org it will contain the WPMU functionality that can be switched on by editing the wp-config.php file.

    So if BuddyPress were to merge into WPMU as well as WPMU merging into WP, then all installations of WordPress (millions of them) would have BuddyPress features as well, which I'm not sure is desirable.

  • Jake Spurlock

    So if BuddyPress were to merge into WPMU as well as WPMU merging into WP, then all installations of WordPress (millions of them) would have BuddyPress features as well, which I'm not sure is desirable.

    It's not that it is, or isn't desirable, but that you have the option. Are millions of blogs going to need all of the MU functionality? No, so you have the option to turn it off.

    Same scenario with BuddyPress.

  • drmike

    Just for reference, you may want to skim the private forums as this now makes the third discusses on the mixing together of the platforms.

    I run 107 installs of wpmu and none of them are running bp. I don't recall a single large wpmu install running bp along with wpmu. (Feel free to correct me if you know of one. And by large, I mean over 45k blogs and using multiple servers.)

    FYI: http://frumph.webcomicplanet.com/webcomic-planet/the-exodus-of-buddypress-the-arrival-of-socialpress/

    This basically means at some point in the future

    What Matt says and what Matt does are two separate things. I could make a list of all the things he's stated in the past as gospel that haven't come true. Oh wait, I did

  • christofire

    Rants aside, I think whyisjake introduces and interesting opportunity. I think it would be fantastic if the WPMU Dev brain trust would offer strategic perspectives in addition to the outstanding support they give us already.

    Particularly these days when social-anything creates a mass hype hysteria among users who request it, developers who build it, and even we who implement and promote it.

    I really like the idea of having access to a team of talented advisors who can help me manage and grow my platform intelligently. (e.g. This is ready, that is not. Pros/cons of this way vs that way. What scales, and what doesn't. Awareness of key decision points, etc.) In other words, I would appreciate the thoughts on best practices and hard-learned lessons from those that operate at a step or ten ahead of most of the rest of us.

    For an example, this sort of experience driven case study, though not technical, is really helpful:

    https://premium.wpmudev.org/blog/making-money-with-wordpress-mu-the-edublogs-story-so-far/

  • drmike

    Particularly these days when social-anything creates a mass hype hysteria among users who request it, developers who build it, and even we who implement and promote it.

    One of the reasons why I was hoping we would see the communities plugin from here made into a public side one instead of everything on the backend. Shouldn't be too hard but I'm limited now.

    I really like the idea of having access to a team of talented advisors who can help me manage and grow my platform intelligently.

    I do like throwing stuff out there from time to time as well. We bounce stuff like that all the time around on our own forums.

  • Andrew

    I was hoping we would see the communities plugin from here made into a public side one instead of everything on the backend. Shouldn't be too hard but I'm limited now.

    How would you handle the task of displaying the content on any theme a user throws at it without requiring special themes? That's exactly why BuddyPress requires special themes. So far no one has come up with a feasible solution.

    Thanks,
    Andrew

  • drmike

    How would you handle the task of displaying the content on any theme a user throws at it without requiring special themes?

    Honest answer: Same way I handle anything else on the main blog: Hard code with a function call. If needbe, page templates with the function calls. I really don't see the need though.

    We already output a lot of profile information on the main blog and none of that requires theme fixes. For example, all of our installs have user pages set up as mymuinstall.tld/users/username/ which lists their recent posts, recent comments, avatar, the profile information, etc. Since the post information is already in blog #1 since we're using that for sitewide tags, the author information is already there. We just started with a random profile plugin and added to it. That plugin didn't require any theme coding.

    Communities I would think would be the same method. (At least for a simple page for each one) Do a page that lists all of them in a table, such as mymuinstall.tld/communities/ giving a link to each community page located at mymuinstall.tld/communities/communityname/ Would have to make nice the community name so it would work as a pretty url. Member info could be included on that page.

    The info is there in the db. Just needs output scripts.

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