I don't understand how I would restore a snapshot. Assume

I don't understand how I would restore a snapshot.

Assume that the root directory of a website was wiped out and all I had was the snapshot file which had been stored elsewhere.

What are the steps to restore?

It appears that I would have to reinstall WordPress, then install Snapshot Pro, then import the snapshot, before I could restore.

Is that correct?

I'm concerned that if I had to restore, I'd have to know the version of WordPress that was installed on the website, the database name, userid, etc. to recover to the point where I could restore from a snapshot.

It also makes me nervous that there's not an option that clearly states "backup ALL tables" nor is there an option that clearly states "backup ALL files"

Perhaps, I'm expecting this to be a complete backup solution when it isn't intended to be that.

Assuming that I am correct that Snapshot Pro isn't what I'm looking for, would you please suggest another backup plugin I might use?

  • Jude

    Hi again @hostricity

    Assume that the root directory of a website was wiped out and all I had was the snapshot file which had been stored elsewhere.

    In the unlikely event that this happens yes you'd need to have at least a basic WP instance set back up with working MySQL creds. Im guessing the version won't matter as much as once Snapshot restores files and tables it will be back as it was originally.

    Perhaps, I'm expecting this to be a complete backup solution when it isn't intended to be that.

    You can see what the developer says on the subject. Snapshot is geared towards making restores quick lightweight and effortless while giving the end user maximum flexibility.

    https://premium.wpmudev.org/forums/topic/snapshot-back-up-i-can-use-it-for-mu-site#post-580003

    There are tons of one click backup solutions out there. The real trouble is when you try restoring from one of those backups.

    Here is a great read on Snapshot
    https://premium.wpmudev.org/blog/backup-with-snapshot/

    Some alternatives are covered here
    http://www.wpbeginner.com/plugins/7-best-wordpress-backup-plugins-compared-pros-and-cons/

    Hope that helps
    Jude

  • hostricity

    Your response doesn't answer these questions:

    Note: At the moment, we're talking about a single site, not multisite.

    1. I don't see settings that will backup all of the tables or all of the files in the root directory - or at least settings that make it clear that's what they're doing.

    2. What is the procedure for restoring?

    Snapshot may be enough since we have continuous backups in place that allow a complete recovery of the database and root directory - but it requires a support ticket and can take 4 or 5 hours to get it done. We've made the decision on our multi-site installations that the only way to do a complete restore is to use our continuous backup system - which is server based and isn't even WP aware.

    I did see the article at WPBeginner before contacting you. It's simply a recitation of features of various backups without actually testing them or any easy way to compare the features.

    We've used Xcloner and Akeeba for years, but now that we are paying for support, etc., from WPMU, we're trying to use WPMU plugins where ever we can.

    It may be that we should use Snapshot for quick recovery when someone screws something up and our continuous backup for major disasters. We've had occasion to have them do a restore and it has always gone perfectly.

    BUT - as I said, I'm still confused about how to set Snapshot up so that I can do a complete restore. What I'm concerned about is someone doing something stupid and destroying a theme, wiping out a bunch of content, or deleting WP core files by mistake. We've had this happen, and they usually have no idea what they actually did, so a lightweight backup would have to take a running WP installation and completely restore the database and the root directory. Otherwise, there's no way to determine if all of the damage done by a customer was actually repaired.

    From a technical standpoint, I'm not even sure how a program running in the root directory could even restore the root directory. With Xcloner and Akeeba, you take an empty root directory, upload a restore program and the backup file. It restores all of the files and connects to the database to restore the database. If the database no longer exists, it gives you the database name, userid, password, and server name to create the empty database and allows you to override them with new information.

    BOTTOM LINE: I'm thinking that Snapshot might be good to fix minor screwups perpetrated on a website by the website owner, etc., - which is 99.9% of what we need - But, I'm unclear how I could tell that everything was backedup and restored. In other words, how do I know all the damage was repaired without wiping the whole thing out and restoring it from scratch.

  • hostricity

    Another question:

    If I were to do a 5 minute install, install Snapshot Pro, import my backup file, and then do a Snapshot Pro restore, would I have a complete website with all of the plugins, a complete database, and themes, etc. restored to completely to the point in time the backup was taken?

    As I said, I don't see anything in the Snapshot Pro configuration settings that gives me a warm and fuzzy feeling about this.

  • Jude

    Hi there @hostricity

    1. I don't see settings that will backup all of the tables or all of the files in the root directory - or at least settings that make it clear that's what they're doing.

    This is implied and you only have options to set exceptions. A note here, it restores everything WP related from the root directory. Its possible some other folders/files etc may be missed. So in short you'll have ALL tables and ALL WP related files backed up.

    2. What is the procedure for restoring?

    If its a simple restore of some code / settings etc and the site is functional it has a one click restore.

    If someone blew the site up then you need to do a fresh install you can Import the zip file and its once again a one click restore. I've added screenshots of the relevant screens.

    BOTTOM LINE: I'm thinking that Snapshot might be good to fix minor screwups perpetrated on a website by the website owner, etc., - which is 99.9% of what we need -

    You're right on this as well. The only things you may miss are the non WP related stuff in randomn/unrelated folders on the site. Std WP folders are covered.

    If I were to do a 5 minute install, install Snapshot Pro, import my backup file, and then do a Snapshot Pro restore, would I have a complete website with all of the plugins, a complete database, and themes, etc. restored to completely to the point in time the backup was taken?

    Yes.

    As I said, I don't see anything in the Snapshot Pro configuration settings that gives me a warm and fuzzy feeling about this

    Thats just a feeling, almost a 100,000 installs of the plugin are active and its one of the plugins with the fewest issues. Next to nothing with Single site setups.

    Jude

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