Index existing posts

I'm installing Post Indexer on a site with pre-existing content. I understand that Post Indexer will only be indexing new posts that are published after it is installed, and can't re-index older posts out of the box.

My question is: Can I trigger it to index say the 20 most recent posts (from before it was installed) by manually editing these, setting them in Draft mode, and then re-publishing them. Will that trigger Post Indexer to add them to it's global posts tabe?

  • wpkitchen

    Thanks David, that sounds good, then I'll try that out, and let you know how it goes. I'm actually wondering about that whole DB structure of WordPress when in multisite mode, that requires things like ekstra non standard tables for the kind of thing that Post Indexer facilitates.

    It would seem to me, that it would've beed a better db design if all posts (and all other blog related data) could have been kept in the same tables to begin with, with an added key of blog_id.
    Any idea if there's a particular point in the current design? I know this has nothing to do with you or your plug-in's – It's a core WordPress thing, so it's just a question out of curiosity, just in case you have a point that would enlighten me regarding this.

  • Timothy Bowers

    Hey there! :slight_smile:

    Just checking in to see how things are going. :slight_smile:

    If you had all sites in the same table this could cause issues down the road for resources, it would make the table huge. Imagine 3000 or even 30,0000 sites all indexing the exact same table at the same time, then if every site was being hit consecutively by hundreds or thousands of users. (busy network) Each query would need to search through one huge table.

    By the time you get to 30,000 blogs you would be doing something with the multi-db plugin to lower the amount of connections to one DB.

    Anyway as we haven't heard form you on this in a while. So I'm going to presume your all fixed up now and don't need any further assistance.

    However if you have more questions or need some more help then please feel free to respond in this thread or create a new one and we will be more than happy to offer assistance. :slight_smile:

    Take care.

  • wpkitchen

    Yes I've solved it. And I also did think about the problem with one table for all posts, which is actually what you get with post indexer and comment indexer. I had problems moving some of the individual comments tables of the site I had to move. Some comment tables was around 70Mb, so if I'd have had comment indexer running on the site, it would have created one very large tabe of comments across the site right?

    The server/sql keept timing out or freezing up when I tried to import the tables. Some tables where 70Mb+.

    I ended up using a handy script called BigDumb (http://www.ozerov.de/bigdump/) It worked great, and moved the data fine. I also found another great script for replacing strings that even handled serialized data. It's called search-and-replace-for-wordpress-databases (http://interconnectit.com/124/search-and-replace-for-wordpress-databases/)

    Together the two scripts saved so many hours of work.

  • Timothy Bowers

    Hey wpkitchen.

    Some comment tables was around 70Mb, so if I'd have had comment indexer running on the site, it would have created one very large tabe of comments across the site right?

    That is correct, but this table would be queried by one site (your main site), and its users, not hundreds of sites and all their users.

    The server/sql keept timing out or freezing up when I tried to import the tables. Some tables where 70Mb+.

    I presume you were using PHPMyAdmin?

    You should deal with large files through SSH to avoid PHP Memory issues. This would take a minute or two.

    I've not tried the scripts you refer to but I've never had a need.

    Anyway as long as its all sorted now! :slight_smile:

    Take care.

  • wpkitchen

    I didn't use PHPMyAdmin, but connected directly to the sql server via an sql client (Sequel Pro for Mac). I didn't have SSH access to the server.

    The size of the comment tables also meant that I couldn't run the network upgrade through WordPress Admin on the servers. The process die (I guess time out) and result in 404 pages. Instead I had to take the whole thing down and run the network update process on my localhost. I never had a WP DB that I couldn't update via WordPress before because it was too large/time consuming. Is this an issue you have experienced?

  • Timothy Bowers

    mmm, I've not had a timeout timeout issues when connecting direct and I've imported large DBs with GBs of data.

    I never had a WP DB that I couldn't update via WordPress before because it was too large/time consuming. Is this an issue you have experienced?

    I would think that increasing the execution time permitted would help with upgrades. But yeah timeouts can happen as limits are used.

    Take care.

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